Design Your Future with Vocational Rehabilitation

The Hope Center for Rehabilitation Infuses “Design Thinking” Into Their Vocational Rehabilitation Program To Help Clients Discover Their Passion, Purpose and Professional Potential.

The Hope Center has a staff dedicated to helping clients successfully maneuver back into the real world while maintaining a balanced life of recovery; by assisting each client in building a foundation and future through the delivery of a comprehensive Vocational Rehabilitation curriculum.

SuitVocational Rehabilitation is the practice of offering patients a guided curriculum to uncover what their unique interests, skill sets and experience levels are in order to design a path toward personal and professional success, while balancing a life in recovery. Vocational Rehabilitation also focuses on offering healing therapies to counter threatening, fearful or traumatic past events that may have contributed to addictive behavior, stemming from one’s past educational or employment history.

Inspired by the “Design Thinking” movement, the staff at The Hope Center for Rehabilitation took notes from thought leaders, like Stanford Universities Bill Burnett. Burnett developed the “Designing Your Life” course at the ivy-league university for his graduating seniors, and within a few years, the course had become so popular it is now being used throughout the country to help anyone reach their full, desired potential.

While originally developed for emerging workforce students, the process of finding your “flow”: identifying those moments, actions, and behaviors that elicit pure joy, positive challenges and heightened energy, help people from all walks of life discover their true vocation, or calling. The staff at The Hope Center took these principles and infused them into their vocational curriculum to help clients format their personal and professional journey in life while uncovering their true passion and purpose.

Vocational Rehabilitation“With the incorporation of ‘Design Thinking’ into our Vocational Program, we are helping our clients not only pursue a successful life in recovery, we help them tap into deep-seeded aspirations that they might never have gotten the opportunity to uncover,” says Vocational Program Director Ed Sergison. “Using these concepts to design their future, in addition to offering therapeutic healing, emotional building and soul searching techniques, our clients are leaving our program with a renewed sense of self and purpose, with a path to achieve their potential.”

After an initial meeting to pinpoint each client’s background, education and employment history, the vocational counselors assist them with developing a plan to incorporate education and/or career goals into their transition from a residential environment to an independent atmosphere.

For those looking to begin a new career, the counselors work with each client on an individual basis to assist them with the creation of a proper résumé. A selection of potential referrals are determined, followed by an overview of interview questions and techniques. The counselors pinpoint unique skill sets and interests of the client, and finally reinforce the importance of presentation, including choice of vocabulary, appearance, attitude and preparedness.

Vocational RehabilitationFor those who wish to pursue a furthered education, like acquiring a GED, associate or bachelors degree, or technical certification, the counselors create a specifically tailored roadmap for the client that offers a realistic timeline and financial plan to achieve their educational goals. The client is presented with Federal financial aid forms, scholarship opportunities and grant applications as part of the process, completed together with the counselor to ensure accuracy and thoroughness.

For clients who already have a seasoned work history, The Hope Center for Rehabilitation has a strong local network of professionals who can help clients receive job placement so they can begin working while developing into their long-term recovery process. It is recommended that a client stay 6-9 months under the care of a rehabilitation facility, or in a transitional-living sober environment for the best chance at achieving long-term recovery. With the help of local job placement services, we can, even temporarily, help our clients build a strong foundation for when they are ready to return home full-time.

The goal of this program is to empower clients to pursue a thoughtful, comprehensive growth plan for sustained employment, offering not just financial but emotional stability as well. This can be a daunting, insurmountable goal on one’s own following treatment, so the relationship between client and counselor weeks and months after treatment is critical as it offers the support needed to sustain the effort. They meet in person or via electronic communication to reflect on progress and discuss challenges that arise so the client can stay motivated and encouraged until they have achieved long-term success on their own.

For more information on Vocational Rehabilitation at The Hope Center, contact Program Director Ed Sergison at 631-793-9415 or via email ad Ed@hopecenterrehab.org.

The Reverse 4th Step

Discover Your Character Traits, Goals & Purpose

Our 12-step fellowship provides a roadmap to uncover the reasons for our addiction. In our 4th step, we list with complete abandon an inventory of our resentments, fears and defects of character, connecting the dots between our pattern of behavior and our addiction. This self-cleanse allows us to bear witness to all of our deepest ailments and then enables us to let them go and work on our defects in the future. It takes courage to dig into our disease and let that become a part of our growth. Recovering addicts are given strength through their vulnerability when they admit their personal faults and actively work on them.

This process relieves us of the things that are holding us back from discovering our true passions. Now, with a renewed sense of self and clarity, there is no better time to discover your true potential. In reading through a number of books on life, awareness and happiness, I realized that many of them encouraged positive personal identification, which included things like skills, natural born talents, character traits and passions. I found myself surprised that I there was no worksheet on taking a positive inventory to identify personal qualities, outlining how one could offer their gifts to the world and pursue their passions in life.

This notion struck a nerve because I believe many of us identify, both prior to and after getting sober, with a fear of the future. In truth, how exactly can we have energy and optimism for the future if we have not identified a path to walk toward it?

You may ask yourself: What is my calling? What are my dreams? How can I ever achieve them? How do I deal with life now? We’ve won the lottery by finding recovery. In many ways we have been “reborn”. We’ve also been granted time and mental space to work on what we most desire. Think about how much better your sobriety will be if you put energy into your dreams and goals? Now that is a great way to create a positive foundation in recovery.

You owe it to yourself to discover your passion and purpose. You can start today with an exercise I’ll call a “Reverse 4th Step”. List the personal attributes you value which strengthen your character and what you can offer the world. Start by making lists of these qualities by following this simple guide:

  1. List the talents you are born with (your natural abilities, aptitudes)
  2. List skills that you have developed or mastered (sports, technologies, art, singing)
  3. List your education & experiences that have made you uniquely specialized (training, travel, etc.)
  4. List your character traits of the spirit (courageous, empathetic, optimistic, grace under pressure)
  5. List your top, most memorable accomplishments (winning a race, best-in-class)
  6. List your values (family, honesty, freedom)

Next, discover your passion and purpose. Most people don’t know what their passion and purpose is because they have never tried to figure it out. You can begin reaching your dreams by first writing them down. According to Dave Kohn, professor emeritus at Virginia Tech, people who regularly write down their goals earn 9x as much over their lifetimes as the people who don’t. Make this list positive, specific and measurable. You would be amazed at how attainable your dreams are if you take the time to identify your ambitions.

By connecting your natural abilities and character traits with the things you are passionate about, you can pursue goals in your life that align with your real purpose. For example, if you are a naturally gifted skier and have a high level of patience, perhaps becoming a ski instructor would be a well suited job for you. Maybe you are extremely good under pressure and love high-energy. You might want to consider a profession in an emergency room or trauma center. If travel is a passion of yours and you’re an excellent writer, decide to embark on a travel blog and share your experiences with the world.

If you follow your passion money and success will naturally follow, not the other way around. The same goes for your journey in sobriety. While identifying our character defects helps us work on being better people in the future, focusing on our character traits can help us pursue the dreams of our innermost soul. Think of your life ahead as an empty canvas: visualize life’s coming attractions by identifying your unique traits and by setting goals because possibilities, adventure, accomplishment, contribution and happiness are waiting.